How do I plant Asparagus crowns?

Soak asparagus roots for several hours or overnight in water prior to planting. Begin by planting the crown about 2 inches deep and plan to add top soil over the crowns as the bed matures. Plant asparagus roots about a foot apart, being sure the crowns are not touching one another in the planting trench. Make sure to plant them at the correct depth! Shallow crowns produce spindly asparagus spears and deep crowns grow shallower with each year of growth. Add compost to the soil for better results. Spears will appear in a matter of weeks after spring planting. Asparagus can be picked for about 6 weeks in the spring. In our area harvest begins in early April and goes through about mid-May. There are only a finite number of buds on the asparagus crown and if one keeps picking until all the buds have been harvested, the crown will die.

How do I plant Rhubarb crowns?

Contrary to asparagus, rhubarb crowns have to be planted shallow. At least 1/4 to 1/3 of the crown surface should be above ground level when properly planted. If the bud itself is below the soil line, it may rot off and fail to grow. We have seen fall planted crowns frost heave and roll around on the soil surface and still grow. This is not an ideal situation, but it makes the point that a shallow crown will often grow and a crown planted below the surface almost certainly will not. Add compost to the soil for better results.

How do I take care of my live Christmas tree?

Warm the tree gradually by bringing it in the garage for a couple of days. Reverse the process when taking it outside again. Keep the tree indoors for a short time- three to five days maximum. Do not let the tree dry out. Moisture will deplete quickly indoors. Soak the root ball thoroughly before and after it is taken indoors. Live trees should be kept well away from wood/pellet stoves, in a separate room if possible. Use ice cubes (at least two trays a day) for slow absorption of water. Check frequently to make sure it stays moist. After Christmas, you can plant your tree in your landscape or donate it to be planted in a forest!

We want to attract hummingbirds to our yard! What plants do you recommend?

Hummingbirds drink nectar out of deep-throated flowers primarily. So, think about planting shrubs and perennials with lots of trumpet-like flowers to attract them. Also, try to stagger bloom time to have food for them available as much of the year as possible. If you provide for their needs, they will come- and stay! Here are some plants that we carry that will attract hummingbirds to your garden:

AGASTACHE
ALSTROEMERIA (Peruvian Lily)
AQUILEGIA (Columbine)
CROCOSMIA
DELPHINIUM
DIANTHUS (Pinks, Sweet William)
DIGITALIS (Foxglove)
FUSHIA
GLADIOLUS
HEUCHERA (Coral Bells)
KNIPHOFIA (Red-Hot Poker)
LILIUM (Lily)
LOBELIA CARDINALIS (Cardinal Flower)
LOBELIA LAXIFLORA
LUPINUS (Lupine)
MIMULUS (Monkey Flower)
MONARDA (Bee Balm)
PENSTEMON (Beardstongue)
PHYGELIUS (Cape Fuchsia)
PULMONARIA (Lungwort)SHRUBS
BUDDLEIA (Butterfly Bush)
CHAENOMELES (Flowering Quince)
RIBES (Red/Pink Flowering Currant)VINES
CAMPSIS (Trumpet Vine)
LONICERA (Honeysuckle)

What Perennials do you recommend to attract Butterflies?

We have a broad selection of plants that will attract pollinators, butterflies in particular, to the garden. Here is a list of a few we recommend. Feel free to call ahead or come visit us to see what we have in stock!

ACHILLEA (Yarrow)
ASCLEPIAS (Butterfly Weed)
ASTER
BUDDLEIA (Butterfly Bush)
CENTRANTHUS (Jupiter’s Beard)
COSMOS (Re-seeding Annual)
DIANTHUS (Pinks, Sweet William)
ECHINACEA (Cone Flower)
ECHINOPS (Globe Thistle)
ERIGERON (Fleabane)
ERYSIMUM (Wallflower)
EUPATORIUM (Joe Pye Weed)
HELIANTHUS (Hardy Sunflower)
KNAUTIA
LIATRIS (Blazing Star)
LIMONIUM (Sea Lavender)
LINARIA (Toadflax)
MONARDA (Bee Balm)
PHLOX PANICULATA – (Garden Phlox)
SALVIA
SCABIOSA (Pincushion Flower)
SEDUM (Uprights)
SOLIDAGO (Goldenrod)
VERBENA
VERONICASTRUM (Culver’s Root)

We have such a problem with deer eating everything we try to grow! What plants can we use in our landscape to deter deer?

Deer love tender leafy greens and flowers but generally avoid strong-smelling and herbs as well as leaves with wooly, fuzzy textures. We have a broad selection of deer-resistant plants to choose from.

ACANTHUS (Bear’s Breeches)
ACHILLEA (Yarrow)
ALLIUM (Ornamental Onion)
ALYSSUM SAXATILE (Basket of Gold)
AMSOMNIA (Blue Stars)
ANEMONE (Windflower)
ARTEMISIA (Wormwood)
ARUNCUS (Goatsbeard)
ASCLEPIAS (Butterfly Weed)
ASTILBE
BEGONIA
BERGENIA
CAMPANULA (Bellflower)
CANNA
CENTAUREA (Cornflower)
CERATOSTIGMA (Plumbago)
CHELONE (Turtlehead)
CIMICIFUGA (Bugbane)
CONVALLARIA (Lily-of-the-Valley)
COREOPSIS (Tickseed)
DIGITALIS (Foxglove)
ECHINACEA (Coneflower)
ECHINOPS (Globe Thistle)
EUPATORIUM (Joe Pye Weed)
EUPHORBIA (Spurge)
FILIPENDULA (Meadowsweet)
GAILLARDIA (Blanket Flower)
GEUM
GYPSOPHILIA (Baby’s Breath)
HELLEBORUS (Lenten Rose)
HEUCHERA (Coral Bells)
IBERIS (Candytuft)
IRIS
KNAUTIA
LEUCANTHEMUM (Shasta Daisy)
LIATRIS (Blazing Star)
LIMONIUM (Sea Lavender)
LINARIA (Toadflax)
MONARDA (Bee Balm)
MYOSOTIS (Forget-me-Not)
NEPETA (Catmint)
OENOTHERA (Evening Primrose)
ORIGANUM (Ornamental Oregano)
PEONY
PAPAVER (Poppy)
PHYSOSTEGIA (Obedient Plant)
PLATYCODON (Balloon Flower)
POLEMONIUM (Jacob’s Ladder)
POTENTILLA
PRIMULA (Primrose)
PRUNELLA (Self Heal)
PULMONAIRIA (Lungwort)
RUDBECKIA (Black-eyed Susan)
SALVIA (Sage)
SAPONARIA (Soapwort)
SCABIOSA (Pincushion Flower)
SOLIDAGO (Goldenrod)
STACHYS (Lamb’s Ear)
TANACETUM (Painted Daisy)
VERBASCUM (Mullein)
VERBENA
VERONICA (Speedwell)

I live in a drier part of the Northwest. What plants do you recommend for drought tolerance?

There are many drought tolerant or drought resistant plants that do well in the Northwest. We recommend planting them in the sunnier areas of Northwest gardens or under eaves, where you get less direct rainfall. Here is a list of drought tolerant perennials that we carry here at the garden center:

ACHILLEA – (Yarrow)
AGASTACHE
AGAVE
ARMERIA (Thrift)
ARTEMISIA – (Wormwood)
ASCLEPIA – (Butterfly Weed)
CALCEOLARIA – (Pouch flower)
CENTAUREA MONTANA – (Cornflower – Hardy Bachelor’s Button)
CERASTIUM – (Snow in Summer)
DELOSPERMA – (Ice Plant)
ECHINACEA – (Cone Flower)
ECHINOPS – (Globe Thistle)
ERYNGIUM – (Sea Holly)
ESCHSCHOLZIA – (California Poppy)
EUPHORBIA – (Spurge)
GAURA – (Whirling Butterflies)
GAZANIA
GYPSOPHILA – (Baby’s Breath)
HEMEROCALLIS – (Daylily)
KNIPHOFIA – (Red-Hot Poker)
LAVENDER
LEWISIA
LIMONIUM – (Sea Lavender)
LINUM (Blue Flax)
PAPAVER ALPINUM – (Alpine Poppy)
PEROVSKIA – (Russian Sage)
PHLOMIS
ROMNEYA COULTERI –Matilija/Mexican Poppy)
SEDUM
VERBASCUM – (Mullein)
VERBENA